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Wayne over at Wayne and Wax is talkin the Dembow again. I wonder periodically what it is about the dembow beat(s) that is so appealing. I mean, of all the songs to catch on, what was it that made THIS one stick?

Well, I wont worry too much about that today. I’ve spent enough sleepless nights transcribing sounds and writing out the where the stress or “percussive” consonants fall just to answer questions that no one but me seems to care about. Dembow es lo mas pegao because its hawt.Thats a good enough answer for me.

Wayne has a paper there which is bound to be interesting, but right now Im having fun listening to the old DemBow and Son Bow. I lost my entire pre-1995 music collection *sigh* so this brings back memories. I loved reggaeton from the moment I heard it, but I never imagined it would blow up like it did or mutate in such interesting ways.

There are a few versions of Wisin and Yandel doin Dembow. My favorite Dembow is Yandel’s Remix from Quien Contra Mi.

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Ah, one of my fave topics.
The Music Of Africa, By Way Of Latin America By Felix Contreras

Joe Cuba did it with two words: “Bang Bang!” Or maybe he did it with the song’s chorus, which sings the praises of down-home soul food: “corn bread, hog mawl and chiterlin’s.”

Whatever it was, the combination of Afro-Cuban groove and R&B backbeat moved way beyond Joe Cuba’s home turf of El Barrio in Harlem to the rest of the country — and even back to the Caribbean.

It was called boogaloo, and it was an organic, cross-cultural musical reflection on how Afro-Latinos in this country have one foot in both cultures.

In the most simple definition of the term, Afro-Latinos are Dominican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Panamanian, Colombian, Venezuelan; descendants of people who are from anywhere that had Spanish slave owners and African slaves.

For starters, let’s travel down to New Orleans, which many in the 19th century considered the northern-most port of the Caribbean. Can you imagine the rich musical exchanges in those port-side bars among freed slaves, Caribbean sailors and other musical adventurers?

Trumpeter Irvin Mayfield and percussionist Bill Summers did. In fact, in 1998, they formed a band called Los Hombres Calientes to play jazz that reflected possibly the first blast of Afro-Latino culture in this country: a mix of African rhythms, Caribbean instrumentation and New Orleans funk.

For starters, let’s travel down to New Orleans, which many in the 19th century considered the northern-most port of the Caribbean. Can you imagine the rich musical exchanges in those port-side bars among freed slaves, Caribbean sailors and other musical adventurers?

Trumpeter Irvin Mayfield and percussionist Bill Summers did. In fact, in 1998, they formed a band called Los Hombres Calientes to play jazz that reflected possibly the first blast of Afro-Latino culture in this country: a mix of African rhythms, Caribbean instrumentation and New Orleans funk.

The latest expression of Afro-Latino culture is the best-selling song on iTunes this week.

It’s a reggaeton tune called “Virtual Diva,” and it’s by a young Afro-Latino who calls himself Don Omar.

Reggaeton was actually born among Afro-Latinos in Panama, made its way to the streets of San Juan and finally found arguably its most creative expression here in the U.S.

Even if you don’t understand the lyrics, you can hear the influence of hip-hop and rap, which have become the lingua franca of Afro-Latinos, African-Americans and just about anyone under the age of 25 in the rest of the world.

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http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=100307740&ft=1&f=10004

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Reggaeton Picks

some faves

Yaviah- Contacto
Straight to the point, no frills shit.

More of the Same
Pistolon

I like this version Best

John Erick

Las Solteras
This is kind of a fun club song.

Dale Matadora

Jadiel- Trankila

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Is this a reaction to the new Wisin y Yandel and DY cds? Lets go back, way back but in the other direction. Less “ethereal” and more dirt and funk?
If I have to choose between the image of dancing hot and sweaty in some shack near the sand, or in a club with lots of flashing lights, I pick the former. Musically, I sort of like the new stuff but emotionally, it doesnt resonate as well as the stuff that brings to mind straight up nasty parties and cut off denim shorts.

Perreo Puro by Franco “El Gorila”, a piece of stripped down old school reggaeton. I like Franco because he pretty much hollers his entire performances.


Here’s El Castigo by Magnate and Valentino from Quimica Perfecta, seems they decided to throw in a bit of da ole school as well. I think its kinda hot. Kinda. Most of the vocals are so breathy and lacking in percussion that i lose interest, but the music is sort of slinky.That old school break, which some kids seem to hate, is the best part of the song to me.

Nely, El Arma Secreta has an instrumental of his Dirty Beat. Its rather nasty, I like it. He was born my senior year in high school. What is goin on?

Villano Sam Yo Quiero Una Morena

I suspect this will grow on me, or I will hate it. Right now I am torn, I dont like the rap parts too much right now, but the Dominican flow is one that creeps on me slowly, so I will give it time. Im feeling the music. I also sort of like vocorder type shit.

A song by Villano Sam and Vakero out of La Republica, dedicated to Obama. I’m not quite sure if I like the singing, but its growing on me. I can appreciate the sentiments expressed.

Voltio y Mas Loca Por Su Tiguere

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