Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘mp3’

I can’t clean without getting crunk. Share in the tradition of Saturday Housecleaning and download these tracks by Master Joe and OG Black. Another Domican/Rican pairing mixing it up and keeping things hot- whats not to like?

From Los K-Becillas

Naciste Pa Mi- A hot bachaton track

Mil Amores- More Bachaton to get you moving

Banshee Robao

Dejala Que Caiga

Read Full Post »

One of my favorite chillin in the summer time tracks. El Soprano singing a love song with the help of Al Jadaqui.

Cupido

Read Full Post »

odilio gonzalez

odilio gonzalez

Here is a track by Odilio Gonzalez, El Jibarito de Lares. He is one of my favorites. I can listen to this all day and all night, though I tend to listen to boleros and “jibaro” music more during the winter. I curl up on the couch under my chenille throw and stare balefully at the walls and sulk. Odilio along with Ramito, Chuito and Los Condes helps me make it until the sun comes back again in March.

Its cool, he’s been around forever, yet I saw him in Puerto Rico playing at a MALL.

Note the bachata feel of the song.

Celos Sin Motivo

Odilio was a favorite of many Dominican musicians who were instrumental (no pun intended) in the development of the bolero campesino aka bachata music aka bachata. They learned from him and copied his style. It certainly explains part of the Puerto Rican fondness for Dominican bachata, no?

I wont get into all that right now, go rent Santo Domingo Blues or find a copy of Bachata A Social History of a Dominican Popular Music. Sad black men sure can play the HELL out of a guitar,no?

Back to Odilio. I shouldn’t even be wasting my time here with you. I need to go sit barefoot on my porch, listen to Odilio and the crickets and consume sugar cane based intoxicants. I hope you enjoy it. I think its just beautiful and find it comforting.

Odilio Gonzalez- Celos Sin Motivo

Juan, this is for you. La Loma de Tamarindo. No, its not EGC, don’t whine. A commenter on You Tube says its a canto hondo de vieques. When I think canto hondo I think flamenco. It’s all cool. huh? From Andalusia to Santo Domingo with some stops in between. I wonder if this was the day I was at the mall??!

Read Full Post »

Free Track by Franco El Gorila

Even if it aint good, its free, what can it hurt?

http://www.mtvtr3s.com/music/artist/franco_el_gorila/artist.jhtml

Read Full Post »

andymCunabiche Adentro is one of my favorite El Gran Combo songs. Andy Montañez really does it in this one! When asked about 3 important moments in his career, he mentioned the recording of this song first.

http://www.identidadlatina.com/print.php?nid=1331&origen=1

¿Puede elegir tres momentos importantes de su carrera?

-Uno fue cuando grabamos en vivo un tema en Venezuela, que se llama “Cunabiche Adentro” es decir, monte adentro y grabamos en vivo rodeados de 25,000 personas, fue impresionate

The song is originally by Ali Primera. From wikipedia-
“He recorded his first album Gente de mi tierra in a studio in Germany. Primera’s compositions talk about the suffering of the people, destroyed by poverty and social inequality. Because of his songs, he quickly made his way into the hearts of the people and soon became known as El Cantor del Pueblo or The People’s Singer.”

Apparently this is a song that held great meaning for the people of Venezuela.

A sample of Cunabiche Adentro. About 3/4 of the way through.

It starts of rather sedately, yet suspensefully. You can hear the excitement of the crowd, as if they know what is coming and can hardly wait. The first time I heard this I was bored as it takes a full 2 minutes until it starts picking up, until then it is almost a mournful dirge. Some horns play, there is a little piano in the back but mostly just plaintive singing.

But then, right before the 2 minute mark it seems to taper off and end, the crowd becomes a bit noisier. And then, the horns spring to life and Andy sings “canto el gallo en la manana” and the crowd goes mad.

This for me is one of the most transcendent moments in salsa. I literally get chills sometimes when I hear this. I smile when I hear it, the crowd is clearly elated and Andy is pouring himself into this song. I feel that there is a communion of sorts and the crowd and the band are united in their joy at this moment. I love it.

And then, some El Gran Combo-ing (ie the music plays in that old EGC fashion) that peters out and then more restrained singing.

“….El le canta a la tristeza
Que en el caney se metió

(….drum roll and intense horns)
Nunca la puede sacar
Porque la lleva por dentro

And then- horns stab at the calm and Andy RIPS IT UP!!
“El llanero canta y llora
El llanero canta y cabalga
El llanero canta y llora
El llanero canta y cabalga”

The crowd is insane! By this point I am usually fully hyped and excited and i sing the next part at the top of my lungs as if I am in concert as well.

“Cubaniche Cubaniche Cubaniche Cubaniche Cubaniche Cubaniche Adentro!”

It goes full speed and then just ends. The song peaks so near the end that you never really come down, its awesome!!

El Gran Combo recorded this live in Venezuela,it can be found on the 1976 release Mejor Que Nunca.

Lyrics- I found them online and haven’t checked them against the vocals to see how accurate they are.

Va cabalgando el llanero
Oliendo a sudor de vaca
Y al cafecito negro
Que bebió en la madrugada

Va cabalgando el llanero
Lo acompaña su tonada
Cuando le canta a la luna
Cuando la luna tiene agua
Huele a no se que la brisa
Se pone a ladrar el perro

Iba llorando el llanero
Aunque lo escuche cantar

Canta el gallo en la mañana
Pero nadie ha averiguao
Cuando es que ´ta triste el gallo

Cabalga
Siempre el llanero
Llorando
Siempre el llanero

Chapoteando en el estero
Una bandada de corocoras
Que se eleva hiriendo al cielo
Vuelve mas triste al llanero

El le canta a la tristeza
Que en el caney se metió
Nunca la puede sacar
Porque la lleva por dentro

El llanero canta y llora
El llanero canta y cabalga
El llanero canta y llora
El llanero canta y cabalga

Llorando el llanero
Sufriendo el llanero
Cunaviche adentro
Cunaviche adentro
Llorando el llanero
Sufriendo su tierra
Llorando su suelo
Cunaviche adentro
Cunaviche adentro
Un rastrojo adentro

Y su tonada dulcita
Como agua de tinajero
Pa´ endulzar su cafe negro
Aunque no endulze su vida

Iba llorando el llanero
Cunaviche adentro
Llorando el llanero
Cunaviche adentro
Un rastrojo adentro
Llorando su suelo
Llorando hasta al sombrero
Llorando al caballo
Tierra adentro
Llanero adentro
Sufirimiento adentro
Llorando el llanero
Llorando hasta al sombrero

Read Full Post »

I am in the process of reviewing all of my salsa. I have to take time away from old favorites and exciting new things so that I can explore some of the good things hidden away in the vaults.

Today I finally got to Larry Harlow and Paso de Encarnacion. Now, I will be honest, I am not normally a fan of anything that is “charanga-ey”. If a song is too “charanga-esque”, I don’t want to hear it. I dislike too much of that chirpy flute stuff, I don’t want my salsa to sound like Peter And the Wolf. I confess though, it has grown on me and often I find the flutes a nice accent and not some intrusive piping little noise.

When this track came on, I figured it was going to be good. Songs that start slowly and acapella and then ramp up, step by step usually have a great payoff in the end. The musicians push and push and push the song until it soars. I wasn’t disappointed with this one. It took about a minute to get there, and I was a bit puzzled as the violins (is that a violin I hear? it sure is!) and trombones did unexpected things. I found it all a tad bit tinny, but good. Then when the rhythm section got going- wow. Talk about phenomenal. They laid it down and locked the groove in and didn’t let up at all.

THIS is the kind of song I love to dance to. You get a little bit of variety in the beginning and then its nonstop salsa. Some people like songs with a lot of breaks and stops and pauses, those have their place. But a song with a good long hard groove is perfect for getting into that flow and dancing some mean street salsa. Where one move, one turn, one spin flows into the other and the dance is 4 minutes of so of nonstop motion.

I can’t tell you what the words were or who was singing, this is one of those songs where the vocals, even though good, weren’t really needed. The rhythm and the ORCHESTRATION are what makes this a masterpiece. As each instrument, each player joined in and added their part to the song, it just got Perfect. Really, that’s all I can say. It was perfect. Everything just fell into place without anyone missing a beat, no pun intended.

Definitely,if you love salsa you GOTTA check this one out!!!

(UPDATED 15 April 2009. I have since learned the words and this is one of my favorite tracks EVER. I now call it “musical perfection”; even my 16 year old son loves it.)

Read Full Post »

Dime off the Eddie Palmieri Ritmo Caliente CD is a killer. The legendary EP is on the piano, and Herman Olivera, of Conjunto Libre fame, is on the mic.
I love this one because everything is so strong and clear, but with no histrionics and you dont get the feeling that they are working too hard at it. The song isn’t sung so much as interpreted, it is at once insistent and relaxed.

Dime

I think this was produced quite well, the piano and percussion are vivid yet they dont overpower the vocals. Everything sounds clean but not sterile. And I have to hand it to both of them, many of the older guys seem to lose their fire, but not these 2, they bring it!

Anyway. Don’t take my word for it, play the clip and hear for yourself. I sort of shorted Herman and let Eddie shine this time, if you want to hear the singing go buy the cd!

Read Full Post »