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Interesting article.How will Aventura’s crossover attempt do? Will mainstream America accept and embrace their music? Can mainstream America figure out how to perceive a group that is both Latin and Black?

Will African American audiences go for it? Hey, that W&Y song with 50 Cent is killin, finally a reggaeton song with a rapper that didnt have the dude hollerin and yowlin all off beat fuckin up the music. An AfricanAmerican friend of mine in FL asked me about De La Ghetto,so the word is getting out there, but does if white Americans don’t buy it but black English speakers do, does that count as mainstream or crossover success? I don’t know what the criteria are.

Well, lets see if Romeo strikes out on his own and if it works. I find him a little too cheesy and cocky, I think he may need the balance of his bandmates to keep from being a caricature. But I could be entirely completely wrong. He seems to have sense of humor and doesnt take himself toooo seriously, and he doesn’t mind sharing the stage and letting El Torito shine when they are on together, so who knows.

From the article

Mr. Santos, Aventura’s suave, sweet-voiced singer — best known by his nickname, Romeo — is a major star and heartthrob. But he and his band mates, Bronx-bred New Yorkers of Dominican descent who sing in both Spanish and English, are nearly invisible in the Anglo news media. Even in their hometown their renown varies from block to block.

“If I’m in a Latin neighborhood, and I walk into a restaurant, I might not be able to eat,” Mr. Santos said. “They’ll be there with the cameras, ‘Romeo, Romeo!’ Down here, though” — Mr. Santos gestured to the indifferent crowd milling on the sidewalk outside the movie theater — “it’s not like that.”

What is the definitive 21st-century New York musical act? A pop critic would probably point to one of the city’s arty indie-rock standard bearers, like TV On the Radio or Animal Collective, or to a rapper like Jay-Z. But pose the question to Latin music fans — or to hit radio listeners in Latin America, the Caribbean and Europe — and the answer will likely be Aventura, whose blend of bachata with R&B, hip-hop and big-city attitude has created a swaggering, distinctly New York style.

Aventura is ubiquitous in the Latin media, but absent from Top 40 radio and major network talk shows. Those outlets that do address Latin music tend to prefer the quirky and obscure, ignoring mainstream sounds embraced by millions.

Aventura, dare I say it, are classic. Their first songs are as popular now as they were when they came out. I can listen to Mi Corazoncito every single day.And Por Un Segundo is killin.

Aventura and Hector Acosta “El Torito”

Wisin y Yandel with Romeo- Noche De Sexo

“Aventura are clearly speaking to bilingual, bicultural youth for whom the old, straight-Dominican ways of presenting themselves doesn’t reflect who they are,” said Deborah Pacini Hernandez,* an associate professor at Tufts University and the author of “Bachata: A Social History of a Dominican Popular Music.”

“I think we put the cool in bachata,” Mr. Santos said. “In the old days maybe kids would hear bachata and say, ‘O.K., I love the song, but, you know, this guy dresses like my grandfather.’ ”

Mr. Santos certainly isn’t grandfatherly, but there is something old-fashioned in his appeal. He specializes in sensuous love songs — declarations of passion, brokenhearted plaints, pleas for forgiveness — singing with a courtliness reminiscent of balladeers like Julio Iglesias

If concert audiences are any indication, Aventura’s stories hold special meaning for Latinas. Even in the songs that are the roughest on women — like the new album’s “Peligro,” a bitter rant about a gold-digger — Mr. Santos’s lyrics, like his quavering voice, carry a vulnerability that sets Aventura apart from the coarser sexual politics of rap and reggaetón.

* I’m not sure why I never noticed the author’s name before today. Duh. Go buy the Reggaeton book as well as the bachata book.I’m even usin a link that wont make it pay me a nickel if you buy the book, just so you know Im not doin this for the kickbacks.

http://www.amazon.com/Reggaeton-Raquel-Z-Rivera/dp/0822343835/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244432224&sr=1-1

Old school, new school- either way you arent learning anything nice.

Sir Speedy, Dj Blass and allll that….

Come to the marquesina, look in the cooler and get a few Heinekens and some Medalla, take off your chancletas and do things that will offend your elders. I probably am one of the elders, but considering the things I did when Patra was popular, I am not easy to offend.

This is killing.

Because one post about perreando just isnt enough!

La Striper- Because La Sista knows what be up. But isnt this Agresivo?

Jowell & Randy Guayteo y DJ Blass
I didnt realize this was Agresivo as well.

FUCK IT,why go through all the “remakes” lets play my song! “tengo una gata que le gusta bien duro, siempre me piede fuerte pa su culo”.

Agresivo Remix

Zion y Lennox, Daddy Yankee- Yo Voy
I feel I should declare this lame,but I like dancing to it.

J King and Maximan- Changueria

Beso el la Boca There is WAY too much spankin dat ass in this video. I may have to play it a few times and watch closely to see whether this is appropriate to post. This video is so absolutely flagrantly, unabashedly, shamelessly wrong that its hot.*

Arcangel- Pistolon Remix

*I do have a major problem with the white folk in the fly house chillin while the hood rat niggas look on ignorantly and try to infiltrate the joint. And I cant find any particular combination of race for any party involved that I cant make WRONG, so Im just gonna sort of focus on the fact that its kinda hot albeit in a very very wrong way that I simply do not approve of. In fact, I approve of NONE of this. There, thats settled.

Sometimes you just feel like getting nasty.

Los Guanabanas- Busco una mujer

Puta Cabrona Bellaca

Plan B- No Me Explota

Franco El Gorila and the Perreo Puro

J-King & Maximan Ft Franco ”El Gorila” & MJ – Zateria

Yaaaaaaaaviahh Wiki Wiki

Wisin y Yandel- Aventura

Got a craving for some latin flavor? Indulge yourself here. I will just warn you, when accepting Leche, Salchica or even a Paleta from a Dominican singer, be sure you know what is being offered.

El Gran Combo with Arroz con Habichuelas

Raulin Rodriguez bringing the flavor of Arroz con Leche

A taste of Cuba- Irakere and Bacalo con Pan

More EGC, Azuquita pal Cafe

And El Menu

Jossie Esteban and El Salchichon

Chupa La Paleta! Oro Solido. Oro WHO? Oro Solido.

Y Hasta las quince- Oro Solido and La Leche

These articles bother me. Its sad because it makes me dislike Calle 13.
When ONE act is consistently singled out by critics and declared to be the best in the genre, perhaps they are the best. But when the critics all seem to be people who hate the genre, then what?

http://sacurrent.com/music/story.asp?id=70200

Daddy Yankee has two daddies.

They’re also Puerto Rican, call themselves Residente (rapper, writer) and Visitante (programming, instrumentation), are known worldwide as Calle 13, and are responsible for killing reggaetón dead.

For that, we thank them.

Actually, to compare Daddy Yankee to Calle 13 at this point is meaningless: Calle 13 only records conventional reggaetón (a Panama/Puerto Rico mix of dancehall, hip-hop, and tropical rhythms) as if to prove that they can do it, too, but deep down, they couldn’t care less about the genre. What they do is music, absorbing like sponges the local rhythms of every city, town, and village they set foot in and mixing them with rap (closer to El Gran Combo than Dr. Dre) and arguably the best lyrics in Spanish-language

I cannot help but think that many of the people who praise Calle 13 do not like reggaeton, some don’t even consider Calle 13 a reggaeton act. So why are you even reviewing the genre? To compare to others,ok. But if you hate reggaeton and think the best reggaeton act out there is one that doesnt do rggaeton, I’m not getting my cd reviews from you.

And lets be real. Elvis Crespo got props but the Dominican merengueros were ignored. In the US if a salsero isn’t white he isn’t noticed. I do feel quite strongly that part of the hype is because Calle 13 look like they do. I feel its classist and racist.

They are better than everyone. Smarter than everyone. Funnier than everyone. Everyone else is stupid, banal and unoriginal.

But see, I LIKE the rest of reggaeton music. I love it. So what are the critics saying about me and the other fans, what are they saying about reggaeton culture in general when they continue to diss everyone but one elite group of college educated white reggaeton artists?

Its not so much that Calle 13 are superior reggaetoneros. Its that they do music that is superior to reggaeton. Superior meaning smart, pan-latino and not “vulgar” and local (and i read local as “black”).

A friend of mine has gone home to India for a few weeks. Hmm, more sarees for me? 🙂 I hope she has a great trip and as a Happy Birthday to her, I will repost this video that she played at her online going away party and a few others.

I like the dancing, I’ll have to see if I want to steal some moves.